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NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Paul Ferraro

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Working Papers

March 2017Do The Effects of Social Nudges Persist? Theory and Evidence from 38 Natural Field Experiments
with Alec Brandon, John A. List, Robert D. Metcalfe, Michael K. Price, Florian Rundhammer: w23277
This study examines the mechanisms underlying long-run reductions in energy consumption caused by a widely studied social nudge. Our investigation considers two channels: physical capital in the home and habit formation in the household. Using data from 38 natural field experiments, we isolate the role of physical capital by comparing treatment and control homes after the original household moves, which ends treatment. We find 35 to 55 percent of the reductions persist once treatment ends and show this is consonant with the physical capital channel. Methodologically, our findings have important implications for the design and assessment of behavioral interventions.
July 2011Using Non-Pecuniary Strategies to Influence Behavior: Evidence from a Large Scale Field Experiment
with Michael K. Price: w17189
Policymakers are increasingly using norm-based messages to influence individual decision-making. We partner with a metropolitan water utility to implement a natural field experiment examining the effect of such messages on residential water demand. The data, drawn from more than 100,000 households, indicate that social comparison messages had a greater influence on behavior than simple pro-social messages or technical information alone. Moreover, our data suggest social comparison messages are most effective among households identified as the least price sensitive: high-users. Yet the effectiveness of such messages wanes over time. Our results thus highlight important complementarities between pecuniary and non-pecuniary strategies.

Published: Paul J. Ferraro & Michael K. Price, 2013. "Using Nonpecuniary Strategies to Influence Behavior: Evidence from a Large-Scale Field Experiment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(1), pages 64-73, March. citation courtesy of

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