NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Karen Dynan

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Working Papers

September 2000Do the Rich Save More?
with Jonathan Skinner, Stephen P. Zeldes: w7906
The issue of whether higher lifetime income households save a larger fraction of their income is an important factor in the evaluation of tax and macroeconomic policy. Despite an outpouring of research on this topic in the 1950s and 1960s, the question remains unresolved and has since received little attention. This paper revisits the issue, using new empirical methods and the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, the Survey of Consumer Finances, and the Consumer Expenditure Survey. We first consider the various ways in which life cycle models can be altered to generate differences in saving rates by income groups: differences in Social Security benefits, different time preference rates, non-homothetic preferences, bequest motives, uncertainty, and consumption floors. Using a variety of instrum...

Published: Dynan, Karen E., Jonathan Skinner and Stephen P. Zeldes. "Do The Rich Save More?," Journal of Political Economy, 2004, v112(2,Apr), 397-444. citation courtesy of

October 1995The Underrepresentation of Women in Economics: A Study of Undergraduate Economics Students
with Cecilia Elena Rouse: w5299
Although women are underrepresented in the field of economics, many see little need for intervention, arguing that women are inherently less interested in economics, or are less willing or able to get the math skills skills needed to do well in the subject. At the same time, others support active efforts to increase the number of women in the field, citing other possible causes of their current underrepresentation. These people argue, for example, that women are deterred from entering the field because of a lack of female role models, or that women are discouraged by an unappealing classroom environment. This study assesses these hypotheses by examining factors that influence undergraduate students' decisions to become economics majors using a survey of students in the introductory econ...

Published: The Journal of Economic Education, Vol. 28, no. 4 (Fall 1997): 350-368.

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