NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Stephen J. Trejo

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Working Papers and Chapters

September 2015Immigrant Employment and Earnings Growth in Canada and the U.S.: Evidence from Longitudinal Data
with Neeraj Kaushal, Yao Lu, Nicole Denier, Julia Shu-Huah Wang: w21591
We study the short-term trajectories of employment, hours worked, and real wages of immigrants in Canada and the U.S. using nationally representative longitudinal datasets covering 1996-2008. Models with person fixed effects show that on average immigrant men in Canada do not experience any relative growth in these three outcomes compared to men born in Canada. Immigrant men in the U.S., on the other hand, experience positive annual growth in all three domains relative to U.S. born men. This difference is largely on account of low-educated immigrant men, who experience faster or longer periods of relative growth in employment and wages in the U.S. than in Canada. We further compare longitudinal and cross-sectional trajectories and find that the latter over-estimate wage growth of earlier a...
October 2010How Do Immigrants Spend Time?: The Process of Assimilation
with Daniel S. Hamermesh: w16430
Using 2004-2008 data from the American Time Use Survey, we show that sharp differences between the time use of immigrants and natives become noticeable when activities are distinguished by incidence and intensity. We develop a theory of the process of assimilation--what immigrants do with their time--based on the notion that assimilating activities entail fixed costs. The theory predicts that immigrants will be less likely than natives to undertake such activities, but conditional on undertaking them, immigrants will spend more time on them than natives. We identify several activities--purchasing, education and market work--as requiring the most interaction with the native world, and these activities more than others fit the theoretical predictions. Additional tests suggest that the costs...

Published: Journal of Population Economics April 2013, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 507-530

May 2007Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans
with Brian Duncan
in Mexican Immigration to the United States, George J. Borjas, editor
June 2005Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans
with Brian Duncan: w11423
Using Census and CPS data, we show that U.S.-born Mexican Americans who marry non-Mexicans are substantially more educated and English proficient, on average, than are Mexican Americans who marry co-ethnics (whether they be Mexican Americans or Mexican immigrants). In addition, the non-Mexican spouses of intermarried Mexican Americans possess relatively high levels of schooling and English proficiency, compared to the spouses of endogamously married Mexican Americans. The human capital selectivity of Mexican intermarriage generates corresponding differences in the employment and earnings of Mexican Americans and their spouses. Moreover, the children of intermarried Mexican Americans are much less likely to be identified as Mexican than are the children of endogamous Mexican marriages. ...

Published: Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans , Brian Duncan, Stephen J. Trejo. in Mexican Immigration to the United States, Borjas. 2007

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers onlyInformation about this author at RePEc

 
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