NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Jason Hwang

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers only

Working Papers and Chapters

December 2007Religious Conversion in 40 Countries
with Robert J. Barro: w13689
Questions about current and prior religion adherence from the International Social Survey Program and the World Values Survey allow us to calculate country-level religious-conversion rates for 40 countries. These conversion rates apply to religion adherence classified into eight major types. In a theoretical model based on rational individual choice, the frequency of religious conversion depends on factors that influence the cost of switching and the cost of having the "wrong" religion. Empirical findings for a panel of countries accord with several hypotheses: religious-conversion rates are positively related to religious pluralism, gauged by adherence shares; negatively related to government restrictions on religious conversion; positively related to levels of education; and negative...

Published: Religious Conversion in 40 Countries Robert Barro1, Jason Hwang2, Rachel McCleary3 Article first published online: 1 MAR 2010 DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-5906.2009.01490.x

December 2005What You Export Matters
with Ricardo Hausmann, Dani Rodrik: w11905
When local cost discovery generates knowledge spillovers, specialization patterns become partly indeterminate and the mix of goods that a country produces may have important implications for economic growth. We demonstrate this proposition formally and adduce some empirical support for it. We construct an index of the "income level of a country's exports," document its properties, and show that it predicts subsequent economic growth.

Published: Ricardo Hausmann & Jason Hwang & Dani Rodrik, 2007. "What you export matters," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, March. citation courtesy of

July 2004The Impact of the Terms of Trade on Economic Development in the Periphery, 1870-1939: Volatility and Secular Change
with Christopher Blattman, Jeffrey G. Williamson: w10600
Most countries in the periphery specialized in the export of just a handful of primary products for most of their history. Some of these commodities have been more volatile than others, and those with more volatile prices have grown slowly relative both to the industrial leaders and to other primary product exporters. This fact helps explain the growth puzzle noted by Easterly, Kremer, Pritchett and Summers more than a decade ago: that the contending fundamental determinants of growth institutions, geography and culture exhibit far more persistence than do the growth rates they are supposed to explain. Using a new panel database for 35 countries, this paper estimates the impact of terms of trade volatility and secular change on country performance between 1870 and 1939. Volatility was ...

Published: Blattman, Christopher, Jason Hwang and Jeffrey G. Williamson. “The Impact of the Terms of Trade on Economic Development in the Periphery, 1870-1939: Volatility and Secular Change.” Journal of Development Economics 82, 1 (January 2007): 156-179.

September 2003The Terms of Trade and Economic Growth in the Periphery 1870-1938
with Christopher Blattman, Jeffrey G. Williamson: w9940
The contending fundamental determinants of growth -- institutions, geography and culture --exhibit far more persistence than do the growth rates they are supposed to explain. So, what exogenous shocks might account for the variance around those persistent fundamentals? The terms of trade seems to be one good place to look. Using a panel data base for 35 countries, this paper estimates the impact of terms of trade volatility and secular change between 1870 and 1938. We find that volatility was much more important than secular change. Additionally, both effects were asymmetric between core and periphery, findings that speak directly to the terms of trade debates that have raged since Prebisch and Singer wrote more than 50 years ago.

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers only

 
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